Oscar Pettiford 1922 – 1945

36-39 OP: “One night Duke Ellington heard me at an after-hour jam session and approached me to join the band. That was before Blanton. But I was 14 or 15 and was breaking the law playing, as it was. So I couldn’t join him. I did get to hear Blanton when I was about 17. When I heard him, I was in love with him right away.” – “I was just with him one night. We had a head-cutting contest right away. Our approaches were a lot alike. We hung out from early evening to break of day. If he’d stayed alive, I’d probably still be in Minneapolis.” – “When Jimmy Blanton died, that gave me more reason to come out and keep the thing moving. There were so many Down Beat poll winners, for example, that weren’t making it.” – “I was impressed by Blanton – and by Adolphus Alsbrook, a Minneapolis bassist I’d known since I was about 16. He was one who was really playing the instrument.” (Adolphus Alsbrook, who later played with Count Basie and Duke Ellington.) –

“On March 18, 1937, … Calloway’s orchestra began a four-month tour… One evening after the show, during their stay in Minneapolis, Hinton and Ben went to a nightclub in St. Paul where they heard a fourteen-year-old bassist named Oscar Pettiford. They were so impressed that they invited him to the theater the next day to let the other musicians from Calloway’s band hear his gifted playing.” (F. Büchmann-Möller: Someone to watch over me. The Life and Music of Ben Webster.)

39 OP left the family band for a short time when he had a small role with the Olsen & Johnson show in a Minneapolis theater.

390924 Harlem Breakfast Club, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Jam Session. Jerry Jerome ts, Charlie Christian g, Frankie Hines p, Oscar Pettiford b, no d. –  Jerry Newhouse recorded this session on location utilizing a Presto acetate disc recorder (12-inch discs at 78rpm). Many airchecks released on LP and CD from that era have come from his archives.

  • I Got Rhythm (take 1)
  • I Got Rhythm (take 2)

Charlie Christian – Air Checks and Private Recordings. Suisa JZCD 379. – Charlie Christian, Volume 9, 1939-1941. Masters of Jazz MJCD 189. – Most other releases are spliced or incomplete. A detailed discussion of all releases is here: Solo Flight. The Charlie Christian Web Site.

  • Stardust

Charlie Christian – Air Checks and Private Recordings. Suisa JZCD 379. – Charlie Christian, Volume 1, 1939. Masters of Jazz MJCD 24. – Charlie Christian: Celestial Express. Definitive Records DRCD11122. – Tom Lord errs: This recording of  Stardust is not on MJCD 189. Stardust on MJCD 189 is from 300902.

  • Tea For Two

Charlie Christian – Air Checks and Private Recordings. Suisa JZCD 379. – Charlie Christian, Volume 9, 1939-1941. Masters of Jazz MJCD 189. – Most other releases are spliced or incomplete. A detailed discussion of all releases is here: Solo Flight. The Charlie Christian Web Site.

Fernando Ortiz de Urbina <fer_urbina@yahoo.com> wrote:

Chris Albertson has posted this recently in the Organissimo forums. Thought it would interest you.

 

******************************************

In 1971 or 2, I produced a 2-record vinyl reissue for Columbia called “Solo Flight,” and it was different from previously available reissues, because I had come across several 16″ acetates of the sessions that contained all the false starts, alternates, etc. Some of you may know that we spliced several “Breakfast Feud” solos together to make his progression clear. I also came across a tape that Frank Driggs had stashed away between a wall and a console, obviously ready to be removed from the premises (a good thing that I happened upon it). It was the near-legendary Minneapolis jam session.

I know that I have mentioned this before, but I was rummaging through a closet earlier today and I came across a pertinent letter that I wish I had been able to draw from when writing the liner notes. It is from Jerry Newhouse, dated May 3, 1972, and I have entered it exactly as he typed it, typos, caps, and all:

I have recently purchased a copy of Columbia Records’ 2-album set G-30779, “SOLO FLIGHT”, featuring guitarist Charlie Christian. I was especially interested in the opening cuts on Side 2, “I Got Rhythm (1 & 2), “Star Dust” and “Tea For Two” —- rather personally interested because I AM THE ONE WHO ORIGINALLY RECORDED THE SESSION!!!!

Let me offer a few pertinent facts for your information. Thanks very much, but I was NOT a disc-jocket — just one of the world’s greatest living authorities on Jazz who was occasionally invited to sound off on the air. The correct date was in the week of 21 September, 1939. Benny and the band were playing a week’s run at the St. Paul Orpheum Theatre. The impromptu recording session took place after hours at the Harlem Breakfast Club in Minneapolis. The personnel was as you’ve listed it except that the bassist was Oscar Pettiford, and there was NO drummer. The following persons can verify my claim to being the original recordist: 1. Jerry Jerome, tenor sax on the date –now at Bell Sound, NYC, 2. Bill Savory (William A. Desavouret) former Columbia engineer–sometimes collator of BG’s albums–and now involved in sneaky details for the Naby Dept. in Washington, DC (Falls Church, Va.), 3. Warren Hicks, co-author of “BG on the Record” of Georgetown, Conn.

I have never commercially capitalized on my privately recorded collection, and the three persons, above, are the only ones who ever got tape copies of my original discs (and FREE, yet). Inasmuch as I don’t ordinarily think of COLUMBIA RECORDS as a “pirate” outfit, I am respectfully submitting a bill for my services as a recording engineer on the aforementioned date. My request is serious, but you will find me easy to do business with–I’ll probably settle for less than $200.”

We asked him to submit a bill and he sent us the original tab for liquor–at 1939 prices! As I recall the check Columbia sent him was more reasonable.

Hope you find my little discovery interesting–I forgot that I had this.

******************************************

 

Albertson also posted this image of Jerry Newhouse’s bill for the use of the Minneapolis jam records by Columbia.

 

http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j275/Nurdley/NewhouseChristianbill.jpg

 

Best,
Fernando

London.

Until 1941: With the Pettiford family band. When the family band finally broke up, Oscar joined Bob Benham’s quartet in Minneapolis. He also worked with various other local groups.

410311 Coffman Memorial Union on the University of Minnesota Campus. – Along with drummer Sidney Smith of the University of Minnesota and pianist Kenny Green, OP helped to stage a Minneapolis jazz concert to which Dimitri Mitropoulos, conductor of the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra had been invited. The three wrote a piece titled Beat Me, Dimitri especially for the concert. Mitropoulos reportedly said, “The music was horrible, but I liked the solo work very much.” Details in: Jay Goetting: Joined at the Hip. A History of Jazz in the Twin Cities. Foreword by Leigh Kamman. Minnesota Historical Society 2011, p. 95f. A fine foto of the event is on p. 96, showing Doc Evans, Rook Ganz, Dale Olinger and Ira Pettiford tp, Frank Morgan as, Popeye Booker p, Eddie Tolck d, OP b.

410503 OP becomes a member of Local 73. No. 3349.

1941 (summer) The Mixed Minny Band, by Robert N. Bob Benham, with introductory comments by John W. Miner. IAJRC Journal 1991 (Benham’s account of the band originally appeared in the October, 1960, issue of The St. Paul Musician). “Bob Benham, a local drummer, took over the bandstand at the Red Feather here. Sepia stars who’s had little chance to show their ability in the last few years dominate the 5-piece outfit of Benham’s, with Harold (Popeye) Booker, the top negro pianist in the northwest, Ira Pettiford, trumpet, Oscar Pettiford, bass, holding up the colored end of the group. A fine Minny trom man, Joe Disch, with fine drummer Benham, … round out the outfit. – We had a lot of real good laughs that summer at Wickland’s club. Although Joe, the trombonist, had an excellent voice and did most of the vocal chores, Oscar also used to sing a few numbers, such as “Little Orphan Annie,” and a few other tunes. Oscar could be a real clown at times. For kicks, he would wear my big old Chinese crash cymbal as a hat, when he did a pseudo-Chinese vocal “The Hut Sut Song.” He looked so ridiculous that he knocked everybody out – including himself. – We did a number of fine originals that Oscar and Popeye composed. I wish I could recall their weird titles. I remember that one of them was called “Me and You.” We used to play a lot of blues, but taking each successive chorus in a different key. Oscar was called “Wild Child.” I don’t know where it came from, unless it was Popeye’s idea, but it seemed to fit him.- We really went all-out to please the customers. Popeye and Oscar played piano duets on the same piano with Oscar beating out two finger vibe stuff a la Lionel Hampton.”

“I also remember Adolphus J. Alsbrook, a quiet, reserved young man who taught Oscar harmony and counterpoint. ‘Dolphus used to get his kicks by reading Schopenhauer and Nietzsche when he was off the stand.”

A 1941 instance in  Minneapolis reported by Down Beat: “The initial attempt by a Minneapolis musician, drummer Bob Benham, to successfully integrate the best in colored and white musicians by using the first mixed band in a downtown spot, ended in dismal failure last month when manager Art Murray was forced to give notice to three of the northwest’s top men, Popeye Booker, and Oscar and Ira Pettiford.” The clientele were “taken aback by the sight of these men playing together, and complained vociferously.” Quoted in Peter Townsend’s Pearl Harbor Jazz: Changes in Popular Music in the Early 1940s. Univ. of Mississippi Press 2007.

42 In 1942, Leigh Kamman hitchhiked to Duluth to audition for a staff job at the NBC affiliate there, although he knew it would be a short gig because the country was at war. He worked in Duluth for eight months, hosting a jazz show — “Symphony in Riffs” — from the Flame, a popular nightspot. “We had Coleman Hawkins on, and Oscar Pettiford [a rising Twin Cities bassist] came up when he heard Hawkins was going to be there,” Kamman said. “He came with us to the sound checks and brought his bass. ‘Let me hear you play,’ Hawkins said.” Impressed, the legendary saxophonist asked Pettiford to sit in with his band. “Then they jammed together all night long. Oscar and Hawkins became friends, and Oscar later joined Duke Ellington’s band.” From an article by Chuck Haga: Leigh Kamman: Polishing the image of jazz. Star Tribune Sep 2, 2002.

43 “Oscar Pettiford emerged as one of the most remarkable success stories of 1943. Just a year before, the young bassist had become so discouraged with the prospects for playing music in his home town of Minneapolis that he had quit the profession altogether for nearly half a year to work in a defense plant.” Scott DeVeaux: Bebop p. 291.

4301-05 Charlie Barnet Orch. w. Chubby Jackson, Oscar Pettiford b. OP composed a Concerto for Two Basses. – A photo of the Charlie Barnet Orchestra with Chubby Jackson, OP, and a third bassist (!), probably Harry Babasin, is in Charlie Barnet’s Autobiography “Those Swinging Years”, 1992, p. 127. – During this period the orch. was recorded for the film:

JAM SESSION. Motion picture. Charles Barton, director. Columbia film soundtrack. Features music by Charlie Barnet a. h. Orch., Louis Armstrong a. h. Orch., Teddy Powell a. h. Orch. a.o. Date of copyright or production of the film is 1944. Charlie Barnet’s orchestra must have been recorded in 1943. Louis Armstrong’s orch. was definitely recorded on April 23, 1943, Teddy Powell’s in early June, 1943.

Charlie Barnet and his Orchestra. Peanuts Holland, Al Killian, Howard McGhee, Paul Cohen tp, Bob Swift, Eddie Bert, Trummy Young, Ed Fromm tb, Charlie Barnet, Steve Cole, George Sivaro as, Kurt Bloom, Mike Goldberg ts, Danny Bank bs, Ralph Burns p, Turk Van Lake g, Chubby Jackson, Oscar Pettiford b, Lou Fromm d. – Note: Peanuts Holland, Al Killian, Howard McGhee, Trummy Young and Oscar Pettiford do not appear on camera. White sideline musicians sat in their places. Cf. Library of Congress. Jazz on the Screen, and IMDb.

  • Cherokee (arr. Billy May)

Reveille With Beverly / Jam Session. Hollywood Soundstage HS5014 (LP), 4007 (CD). Thanks, Joseph Scott, for the info! Joseph wrote: “Barnet’s version of “Cherokee” for Jam Session is four minutes long, and it’s heard complete in good sound on the CD.”

430215 Chicago, Il., Room 305, Savoy Hotel. Charlie Parker Jam Session. Charlie Parker ts, Dizzy Gillespie tp, Oscar Pettiford b. – [Tom Lord P647 & P648. Coover Gazdar 43010 has Shadow Wilson d.]

  • Sweet Georgia Brown

Dizzy Gillespie. Vol. 4. 1943-1944. Masters of Jazz (F). – Stash Records ST 260. Stash STCD535. Also on: Jazz Archives No. 88. – Acetate made by Bob Redcross.

430228 Chicago, Il., Room 305, Savoy Hotel. Charlie Parker Jam Session. Billy Eckstine tp, Charlie Parker ts, unkown ts, Hurley Ramey g, Oscar Pettiford b, Bob Redcross brushes. – Tom Lord P647: “Some sources list Goon Gardner (ts) on “Three Guesses” and not Parker. Oscar Pettiford (b) although listed on issues as being present, is not audible.”

  • Three Guesses (4:12)
  • Boogie Woogie (3:47) (HR out)

Stash Records ST 260. Stash STCD535. – Acetates made by Bob Redcross.

430421 One of the first salvos in a new war on vice in Harlem was to close down the Savoy Ballroom on 141st and Lenox. Mayor LaGuardia gave the order to padlock the popular dance hall on April 21, 1943. Harlemites were up in arms: If vice were really the issue, the Savoy was the last place to target. Cf. Kelley: Thelonious Monk p. 85.

4305 “In May, Pettiford left the [Barnet] band and came to New York. Shortly afterward, he replaced Nick Fenton as the house bassist at Minton’s Playhouse, working alongside Monk.” Scott DeVeaux: Bebop p. 291. With the arrival of Pettiford, according to Monk, “we got a different way to play rhythm. Pretty soon everybody followed our example and that’s the kind of rhythm section they play today.” Les Tomkins interview w. Thelonious Monk, 1965. Quoted in Kelley: Thelonious Monk p. 85.

4306 Roy Eldridge took a five-piece band into the Onyx Club on 52nd Street, part of the time working alongside Billie Holiday. OP and Charles Thompson were in the band. Down Beat Aug 1, 1943: “Eldridge is putting on a show every night that is sensational.” Cf. John Chilton: Roy Eldridge. Little Jazz Giant, p. 135.

43 – second half. Cf. Arnold Shaw: 52nd St. p. 269 f. The Pettiford-Gillespie or Gillespie-Pettiford group at the Onyx. The combo split apart with the coming of spring. OP remained at the Onyx (into the summer?), replacing Dizzy with Joe Guy. Cf. 4401 & 440113.

431204 Leonard Feather’s Esquire All Stars. Cootie Williams tp, Edmond Hall cl, Coleman Hawkins ts, Art Tatum p, Al Casey g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sid Catlett d. – See Leonard Feather: “Goffin, Esquire, and the Moldy Figs”, in Robert Gottlieb (ed.): Reading Jazz.

  • A 4691-1 Esquire Bounce                Commodore 547-A
  • A 4691-2 Esquire Bounce (alt)
  • A 4692-1 Boff Boff (Mop Mop*) (alt)
  • A 4692-2 Boff Boff (Mop Mop*)    Commodore 548-B
  • A 4693-1 My Ideal                          Commodore 548-A
  • A 4693-2 My Ideal (alt)
  • A 4691-1 Esquire Blues (alt)
  • A 4694-2 Esquire Blues                   Commodore 547-B

Commodore Classics: Coleman Hawkins. Commodore 6.24056 AG. – Masters also on: Giants of the Tenor Sax. Coleman Hawkins / Frank Wess. Commodore Classics CCL 7003 mono.

*From Leonard Feather’s liner notes to 52nd Street Scene 580806-07: “The origin of this tune is in much dispute. It was originally recorded by my own group of Esquire poll winners on Commodore in 1943. For a year or two before that the riff had been played by musicians along The Street; some claim that drummer Kenny Clarke was among the first to use it. The original label wrongly credited the composition to me; actually it was copyrighted in the name of Coleman Hawkins.”

  • Esquire Blues

Also on: Oscar Pettiford: Bass Hits. Topaz 1071.

  • My Ideal

Also on: Coleman Hawkins: Body And Soul. Dreyfus Jazz FDM 36721-2.

Leonard Feather’s All Stars. (same)

  • Mop Mop
  • My Ideal

Commodore 548.

431208 NYC. Coleman Hawkins & His Orch. Coleman Hawkins ts, Bill Coleman tp, Andy Fitzgerald cl, Ellis Larkins p, Al Casey g, Oscar Pettiford b, Shelly Manne d. [Coover Gazdar 43030]

  • T 1905 Voodte
  • T 1906-1 How Deep Is The Ocean*
  • T 1907 Hawkins Barrelhouse
  • T 1908-2 Stumpy*

Mosaic Box Classic Coleman Hawkins Sessions 1922-1947. – Coleman Hawkins – Ben Webster – Julian Dash. Sax Vol. 1. EPM (F) FCD 5008. – *also on: Coleman Hawkins: Body And Soul. Dreyfus Jazz FDM 36721-2.

431218 WOR Studios, NYC. Coleman Hawkins & His Quintet. Coleman Hawkins ts, Ellis Larkins p, Jimmy Shirley g, Oscar Pettiford b, Max Roach d. [Coover Gazdar 43040]

  • T 1917-alt Lover Come Back To Me – previously unissued
  • T 1917 Lover Come Back To Me
  • T 1918 Indiana – previously unissued
  • T 19001 Blues Changes
  • 19002 These Foolish Things – unissued, master no longer exists

Mosaic Box Classic Coleman Hawkins Sessions 1922-1947. – T 1917 & T 19001 also on Coleman Hawkins – Ben Webster – Julian Dash. Sax Vol. 1. EPM (F) FCD 5008.

431223 NYC. Coleman Hawkins Swing Four. Coleman Hawkins ts, Eddie Heywood p, Oscar Pettiford b, Shelly Manne d. [Coover Gazdar 43050]

  • T 1923-2 Crazy Rhythm*
  • T 1924-2 Get Happy

Signature 28104.

Signature 90001. – Mark Cederquist a.k.a. “SwingMan1937” is sharing his original 78rpm recordings on YouTube.

All titles on: Coleman Hawkins – Ben Webster – Julian Dash. Sax Vol. 1. EPM (F) FCD 5008. – *also on: Oscar Pettiford: Bass Hits. Topaz 1071. – The Man I Love also on: Ken Burns Jazz: Coleman Hawkins. Verve 549 085-2.

  • T 19005 The Man I Love
  • T 19006 Sweet Lorraine

also on: Coleman Hawkins: Body And Soul. Dreyfus Jazz FDM 36721-2.

All recordings of 431223 on Mosaic Box Classic Coleman Hawkins Sessions 1922-1947.

Oscar Pettiford’s solo on The Man I Love is famous. Because of the simple recording technique of the day – they increased the volume for his solo – his breathing can be heard, and it reveals that OP breathes like a horn player. One can play hundreds of notes on the bass, never pausing, and breath anywhere one wants, but OP breathes in the pauses, and he pauses and breathes only in structurally meaningful places. He must have learned it by watching a player of wind instruments or by playing such an instrument himself. (George Hoefer in Down Beat: “Regarding his own participation (in the Pettiford family band) the bassist said that when his father brought in an outsider to play bass horn in 1930 he really started to pay attention to the band. Young Oscar then began playing trumpet and trombone in addition to drums and piano.” – “The bass horn player got married and left the band in 1936, and Oscar … stepped in his place. This happened in Augusta, Ga., where the band was on summer location. A musician named Kid Chocolate … had left his bass in the storage room of the place they were working, and Oscar started on that. When Chocolate came back, Oscar’s dad bought him his own bass.” Pat Harris in Down Beat). – This way of musical or rhythmic breathing has a psychic effect, too. It can also be observed with good boxers. Like a yoga exercise, it makes you calm and wide awake at the same time. – I found it very interesting that Coleman Hawkins can be heard breathing this way, too, on Lover Come Back To Me 431218; and cf. OP’s solo on Crazy Rhythm 431223!

[Lord H3136-7 has:

  • T 19005(alt) The Man I Love

V-Disc 529, Fonit Centra (It) VDL 1008.

It is not included in Coleman Hawkins’ Alternate Takes at Neatwork. After hearing V-Disc 529 we can say that this is no alternate take, but the same as on Signature 90001. – On V-Disc 529 Johnny Bothwell: The Trouble With Me Is You / I’ll Remember April is coupled with Coleman Hawkins Swing Four: The Man I Love. Fonit Cetra (not Centra) VDL 1008 is called: V-Disc. Le Stelle del Jazz.]

44 OP wins the Esquire Magazine Gold Award for bass. – For the history of the Esquire concerts see the chapter “Goffin, Esquire, and the Moldy Figs” in Leonard Feather’s book The Jazz Years, reprinted in Robert Gottlieb (ed.): Reading Jazz.

44 Oscar and Harriet get married in Mexico.

44 JAM SESSION. Motion picture. Charles Barton, director. Columbia film soundtrack. Features music by Charlie Barnet a. h. Orch., Louis Armstrong a. h. Orch., Teddy Powell a. h. Orch. a.o. Date of copyright or production of the film is 1944. Charlie Barnet’s orchestra must have been recorded in 1943. Louis Armstrong’s orch. was definitely recorded on April 23, 1943, Teddy Powell’s in early June, 1943. See above: 4301-05 & 4305.

44 NYC. Milt Page Trio feat. Oscar Pettiford. Milt Page voc, p, unknown g, Oscar Pettiford b.

Manor 1000. – A discography of this label is here.

4401 (?) Broadcast from the Onyx Club, NYC. Dizzy Gillespie – Oscar Pettiford. Dizzy Gillespie tp, Budd Johnson ts, George Wallington p. Oscar Pettiford b, Max Roach d.

  • A Night In Tunisia (incomplete)

Dizzy Gillespie. Vol. 4. 1943-1944. Masters of Jazz (F) MJCD 86. – In 4401 Budd Johnson replaced Don Byas. The group soon broke up. OP stayed at the Onyx, with Joe Guy tp, Johnny Hartzfield ts, Joe Springer p, Harold West d.  4404 finds Dizzy Gillespie w. Budd Johnson, Clyde Hart, Leanord Gaskin and Jackie Mills at the Yacht Club, opposite the Onyx.

440113 Billie Holiday, accompanied by the Al Casey Trio, opened at the Onyx Club, 56 or 57 West 52nd Street, New York City. Also on the bill, Oscar Pettiford and his band. Note that Down Beat said “with Dizzy Gillespie combo” probably assuming they were carried over from December 1943. Music Dial said “shares honors with Toy Wilson”. Thursday 13th January 1944 until end March 1944.

440116 NYC. Esquire All American All Stars. (Sunday). Broadcast. Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street. The Blue Network – ABC. Louis Armstrong tp, Jack Teagarden tb, Coleman Hawkins ts, Art Tatum p, Al Casey g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sid Catlett d.

  • Basin Street Blues
  • Esquire Blues
  • Honeysuckle Rose

Louis Armstrong. Vol. 9. “1944-1949”. Ambassador CLA 1909.  Note on the CD: “Not from the Metropolitan Opera House Concert taking place two days later.” – OP soloes on Esquire Blues. 

440116 NYC. Clyde Hart starts jam sessions at Jimmy Ryan’s (53 W. 52. St.) w. Charlie Shavers, Hot Lips Page tp, Wilbur DeParis tb, Buster Bailey cl, Oscar Pettiford b, Specs Powell d.

440118 NYC. Esquire All Stars. Metropolitan Opera House Jam Session. Louis Armstrong, Roy Eldridge tp, Jack Teagarden tb, Barney Bigard cl, Coleman Hawkins ts, Lionel Hampton vib, Red Norvo xylophone, Art Tatum, Teddy Wilson p, Al Casey g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sid Catlett d, Billie Holiday, Mildred Bailey voc (collective personnel). – For some details cf. John Chilton: Roy Eldridge. Little Jazz Giant. P. 137f. – The New York Times, January 19, 1944: “The Metropolitan Opera House was the scene of a jazz jam session last night, given by the Esquire All-American band, 1944, in connection with the Fourth War Loan Drive. A total of $650,000 was raised from the sale of tickets, which went only to 3,600 purchasers of war bonds of denominations from $25 to $100, and subscribers for the boxes. – Whistling in all parts of the sold-out house, including the ‘diamond horse shoe,’ greeted the band when the curtain went up, and was repeated frequently throughout the evening. This was in line with the ‘informality and spontaneity essential to a jam session,’ as a program note put it. The members of the band were drawn from the winners in the Esquire magazine’s 1944 jazz poll to select the nation’s ‘firsts’ in jazz. Part of the concert was broadcast over the WJZ Blue Network by the Victory Parade of Spotlight Bands. – Benny Goodman, first-place clarinet winner, who is making a picture in Hollywood, piped in a number by direct wire. … Leonard Feather of the Esquire staff was master of ceremonies, sitting at one side of the stage before a high table with a microphone. Dr. Robert Goffin, chairman of the board of judges who picked the winners in the contest, presented the awards, consisting of ‘Eskies,’ little gold images which are the swing edition of the movies’ ‘Oscar.’ Each winner also received $500 in war bonds.”

  • Esquire Blues
  • Mop Mop
  • Do Nothin’ Till You Hear From Me
  • I Love My Man (Billie’s Blues)
  • I Can’t Give You Anything But Love
  • I Got A Right To Sing The Blues
  • Sweet Lorraine
  • I Got Rhythm
  • The Blues
  • We All Drink „Coca Cola”
  • Esquire Bounce
  • Rockin’ Chair
  • Basin Street Blues
  • I’ll Get By
  • Tea For Two
  • Back O’Town Blues
  • Muskrat Ramble
  • Buck Jumpin’
  • Stompin’ At The Savoy
  • For Bass Faces Only (by Oscar Pettiford; was adapted by Ray Brown, Dizzy Gillespie and Gil Fuller and became famous as „One Bass Hit”. Ken Burns Jazz: Dizzy Gillespie. Verve 549 086-2, sets it right: OP is named as the composer, Gil Fuller as the arranger of One Bass Hit, No. 2)
  • My Ideal
  • Rose Room
  • I’ve Got A Feeling I’m Falling
  • More Than You Know
  • Squeeze Me
  • Honeysuckle Rose
  • Flying Home (Flyin’ On A V-Disc)
  • Jamming The Vibes
  • Star Spangled Banner

Esquire Jazz Concert. Metropolitan Opera House, Jan. 18, 1944. Chrisly Records CR 80003. – Note: The complete Metropolitan Opera House Jam Session is on Jazzline JL 95810-14 (The First And Second Esquire Concert), and on Festival Album 269 (Bielefelder 1985/86).

Excerpts from the concert:

  • Esquire Blues
  • I Got Rhythm
  • I Can’t Give You Anything But Love*
  • Basin Street Blues**
  • Vibes Duet (Jammin’ The Vibes)*
  • Esquire Bounce**
  • My Ideal**
  • Stompin’ At The Savoy
  • For Bass Faces Only
  • Muskrat Ramble

Coleman Hawkins: Passin’ It Around. Jazz Hour (Belgium) 73515 (except*). And on: Metropolitan Opera House Jam Session. Jazz Anthology 550212 (except**).

  • Flyin’ On A V-Disc – Part 1
  • Flyin’ On A V-Disc – Part 2

Roy Eldridge: Minor Jive. History 20.1973-HI

Art Tatum Trio. Art Tatum p, Oscar Pettiford b, Sid Catlett d.

  • Sweet Lorraine

Art Tatum: The V-Discs. Black Lion BLP 60114 (760114). And on: Metropolitan Opera House Jam Session. Jazz Anthology 550212.

Billie Holiday With The All-Star Jam Band. Esquire First Annual Jazz Concert. Billie Holiday voc. Roy Eldridge tp, Jack Teagarden tb, Barney Bigard cl, Coleman Hawkins ts, Art Tatum p, Al Casey g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sid Catlett d.

  • Do Nothin’ Till You Hear From Me
  • I’ll Get By

Masters of Jazz Vol. 3: Billie Holiday. Storyville SLP 4103. And on: Metropolitan Opera House Jam Session. Jazz Anthology 550212.

Esquire Metropolitan Opera House Jam Session. Barney Bigard cl, Art Tatum p, Al Casey g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sid Catlett d.

  • VP-467 Mop Mop. – Spoken introduction by Louis Armstrong and Roy Eldridge.

V-Disc 135B.

  • VP-470 Rose Room* – Spoken introduction by George Simon and Sid Catlett.

V-Disc 152. – Sid Catlett 1944-1946. Classics (F) 974.

440126 (recte: 440118) Louis Armstrong & His Orch. Louis Armstrong, Roy Eldridge tp, Jack Teagarden tb, Barney Bigard cl, Coleman Hawkins ts, Lionel Hampton vib, Art Tatum p, Al Casey g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sid Catlett d. Billie Holiday, Mildred Bailey voc.

  • Back O’Town Blues
  • Basin Street Blues
  • Mop Mop
  • Flying On’ (!)
  • Rose Room

The Immortal Live Sessions 1944 / 1947. Jazz Anthology JA 5102.

440216 NYC. Coleman Hawkins & His Orch. Dizzy Gillespie, Vic Coulson, Ed Vandever tp, Leo Parker, Leonard Lowry as, Coleman Hawkins, Don Byas, Ray Abrams ts, Budd Johnson ts, bs, Clyde Hart p, Oscar Pettiford b, Max Roach d.

Apollo 752.

Coleman Hawkins: Rainbow Mist. Delmark DD-459; except* also on: Coleman Hawkins: Body And Soul. Dreyfus Jazz FDM 36721-2. – **also on: Ken Burns Jazz: Coleman Hawkins. Verve 549 085-2. – R 1000 & 1001 also on: Dizzy Gillespie. Vol. 4. 1943-1944. Masters of Jazz (F) MJCD 86.

440222 same

  • R 1003 Disorder At The Border*
  • R 1004 Feeling Zero
  • R 1005 Rainbow Mist (Body And Soul)

Coleman Hawkins: Rainbow Mist. Delmark DD-459; *also on: Oscar Pettiford: Bass Hits. Topaz 1071, on: Ken Burns Jazz: Dizzy Gillespie. Verve 549 086-2, and on: Dizzy Gillespie. Vol. 4. 1943-1944. Masters of Jazz (F) MJCD 86.

440226 Earl Hines Trio. Earl Hines p, Al Casey g, Oscar Pettiford b.

  • F 1000 My Fate Is In Your Hands        Signature 28110
  • F 1001 I’ve Got A Feeling I’m Falling    Signature 28109
  • F 1002 Honeysuckle Rose                    Signature 28110
  • F 1003 Squeeze Me                             Signature 28109

Signature 78rpm called Fats  Waller Memorial. – The Indispensable Earl Hines Vol. 5/6: The Bob Thiele Sessions. RCA PM 45358.  – Coral (F) ECV 18035 (Connaissance du Jazz Vol. 9). – Earl Hines & His Orch. 1942-1945. Classics 876.

440301 NYC. Sammy Price & His Blusicians. Bill Coleman tp, Joe Eldridge as, Ike Quebec ts, Sammy Price p, Oscar Pettiford b, Harold “Doc” West d. – This recording session was produced and supervised by Milt Gabler for World Broadcasting Systems, Inc.

  • N-1800-1 That’s Kicks (unissued)
  • N-1800-2 That’s Kicks (unissued)
  • N-1800-3 That’s Kicks (incomplete)
  • N-1800-4 That’s Kicks (issued)
  • N-1801-1 Pluckin’ That Thing (incomplete)
  • N-1801-2 Pluckin’ That Thing (issued)
  • N-1801-3 Pluckin’ That Thing (unissued)
  • N-1802-1 Boogie Woogie Notion (issued)
  • N-1803-1 House Rent Boogie (false start)
  • N-1803-2 House Rent Boogie (issued)
  • N-1804-1 Big Joe (incomplete)
  • N-1804-2 Big Joe (false start)
  • N-1804-3 Big Joe (unissued)
  • N-1804-4 Big Joe (issued)
  • N-1805-1 Boogin’ A-Plenty (false start)
  • N-1805-2 Boogin’ A-Plenty (issued)
  • N-1806-1 Sweet Lorraine (issued)
  • N-1807-1 Honeysuckle Rose (false start)
  • N-1807-2 Honeysuckle Rose (incomplete)
  • N-1807-3 Honeysuckle Rose (false start)
  • N-1807-4 Honeysuckle Rose (issued)

The complete session including the false starts, incomplete takes, altenate takes, unissued takes is on:

Sammy Price and his Blusicians – 1944. Circle CLP-73. – Sammy Price and his Blusicians. Progressive PCD-7074.

  • N-1800-4 That’s Kicks
  • N-1801-2 Pluckin’ That Thing*
  • N-1802-1 Boogie Woogie Notion
  • N-1803-2 House Rent Boogie
  • N-1804-4 Big Joe
  • N-1805-2 Boogin’ A-Plenty
  • N-1806-1 Sweet Lorraine
  • N-1807-4 Honeysuckle Rose*

Sam Price 1942-1945. Classics 1083. – 1801 & 1804 originally on Decca 48097. – *also on Oscar Pettiford: Bass Hits. Topaz 1071 (says that Pluckin’ That Thing is by Oscar Pettiford; Classics says: by Sam Price. The Library of Congress Catalog of copyright entries. Part 3: Musical compositions. Pluckin’ that thing; by Sam Price & Oscar Pettiford; pf. treble. © 1 c. Apr. 5, 1944; E unp. 370517; Northern music corp.; New York. 18644).

440401 Walter „Foots” Thomas & His Jump Cats (Walter „Foots” Thomas & His All Stars). Walter „Foots” Thomas as, ts, Emmett Berry tp, Budd Johnson cl, ts, Ben Webster ts, Clyde Hart p, Oscar Pettiford b, Cozy Cole d.

  • 8125A    Broke But Happy              Joe Davis 8125, Celebrity 8125
  • 8125B-4 Blues On The Delta                 –                        –
  • 8126A-5 Jumpin’ With Judy*            Joe Davis 8126, Celebrity 8126
  • 8126B-3 Blues On The Bayou               –                        –

The Walter “Foots” Thomas All Stars. Prestige 7584. – *also on: Oscar Pettiford: Bass Hits. Topaz 1071.

  • 8125B-1 Blues On The Delta
  • 8125B-2 Blues On The Delta
  • 8125B-3 Blues On The Delta (incomplete)
  • 8126A-1 Jumpin’ With Judy
  • 8126A-2 Jumpin’ With Judy (incomplete)
  • 8126A-3 Jumpin’ With Judy
  • 8126A-4 Jumpin’ With Judy (incomplete)
  • 8126B-1 Blues On The Bayou
  • 8126B-2 Blues On The Bayou

Unissued Bean & Ben Takes 1944. Harlequin HQ 2032 IMS. – Ben Webster 1944. The Alternate Takes in Chronological Order. Neatwork RP 2055.

440413 Billy Eckstine with the De Luxe All Stars. Billy Eckstine voc, ld, Dizzy Gillespie, Freddie Webster, Shorty McConnell, Al Killian tp, Trummy Young, Claude Jones, Howard Scott tb, Budd Johnson, Jimmy Powell as, Wardell Gray, Thomas Crump ts, Rudy Rutherford bs, Clyde Hart p, Connie Wainwright g, Oscar Pettiford b, Shadow Wilson d. Budd Johnson, Gerry Valentine arr.

Billy Eckstine: Blowing The Blues Away. Swingtime ST 1015. – Billy Eckstine. Laserlight 17070. – 108 & 109 also on: Dizzy Gillespie. Vol. 4. 1943-1944. Masters of Jazz (F) MJCD 86. – *also on: Oscar Pettiford: Bass Hits. Topaz 1071. –  I Got A Date With The Rhythm Man features OP.

440417 Ben Webster Quartet. Ben Webster ts, Johnny Guarnieri p, Oscar Pettiford b, David Booth d.

  • S5436-2 Honeysuckle Rose        Savoy 553
  • S5438-2 Blue Skies                           –
  • S5439 Kat’s Fur                          Savoy 580
  • S5437-1 I Surrender Dear*                –

The Tenor Sax Album. The Savoy Sessions. Savoy WL 70812(2). – Ben Webster 1944-1946. Classics (F) 1017. – Except* also on: Oscar Pettiford: Bass Hits. Topaz 1071.

  • S5436-1 Honeysuckle Rose
  • S5438-1 Blue Skies
  • S5437-2 I Surrender Dear

The Changing Face of Harlem. The Savoy Sessions. Savoy SJL 2208.

440426 NYC. Earl Hines Sextet. Ray Nance tp, v, Johnny Hodges as, Flip Phillips ts, Earl Hines p, Al Casey g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sid Catlett d, Betty Roché voc*.

  • R 1006 Blues On My Weary Mind*     Apollo 358
  • R 1007 I Love My Lovin’ Lover*         Apollo 356
  • R 1008 Trouble, Trouble*                    Apollo 357
  • R 1009 Design For Jivin’                            –
  • R 1010 I’ll Get By*                              Apollo 358
  • R 1011 Life With Fatha                        Apollo 356

Earl Hines & the Duke’s Men. Delmark DD-470. Complete session also on: The Chronological Earl Hines & His Orch. 1942-1945. Classics 876, and on: The Dukeless Gang. Queen Disc 041. Blues, Trouble, Design, and I‘ll Get By also on: Dinah Washington Sings the Blues. Grand Award GA 33-264 and GA 264 SD. – R 1008 & 1009 also on: Ray Nance 1949–1949 The Non-Ducal Violin Recordings Featuring Ben Webster. ABCD1-014. This CD is worth searching for because of some previously unreleased Blanton.

440501 NYC. Ed Hall and the Big City Jazzmen. Charlie Shavers tp, Edmond Hall cl, Frankie Socolow ts, Eddie Heywood p, Oscar Pettiford b, Sid Catlett d.

  • SHAD-I Blues In Room 920. Delta D-10-1
  • SHAD-II Sweet Georgia Brown. Delta D-10-2

Sid Catlett and the Regis All Stars (same).

  • S1185-1 Blue Skies. Regis 5000

Sid Catlett and the Big City Jazzmen (omit Hall).

  • SHAD-III Blue Skies. Delta D-10-3
  • SHAD-IV Thermodynamics. Delta D-10-4

Sid Catlett 1944-1946. Classics (F) 974. – Titles are reversed on Delta D-10-3 / 10-4.

440516 NYC. Sonny Greer & His Rextet. Rex Stewart co, Lawrence Brown tb, Jimmy Hamilton cl, ts, Harry Carney bs, Marlowe Morris p, Teddy Walters g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sonny Greer d, Brick Fleagle arr.

  • R 1012 Sleepy Baboon                Apollo 354
  • R 1013 Kansas City Caboose              –
  • Kansas City Caboose (alt)
  • R 1014 Ration Stomp                   Apollo 355
  • R 1015 Helena’s Dream                        –
  • Helena’s Dream (alt)*

The Dukeless Gang. Queen Disc 041. Except* also on: Earl Hines & the Duke’s Men. Delmark DD-470.

440610 The Billboard p. 18. “Oscar Pettiford.(Reviewed at the Onyx, New York). – Justifiably popular with swing fans, this compact unit blaring forth at the Onyx has dropped singers in order to avoid the cabaret tax, substituting instead outstanding instrumentalists. Oran (Hot Lips) Page, top-drawer trumpeter, is currently appearing with the unit, delivering in his well-known top-of-the-heap style. – Oscar Pettiford, leader and bass, and John Hartzfield, tenor sax, make the customers sit up and take notice. Joe Guy, second trumpet, and well with the difficult assignment of building up the first horn, yet never quite being left out of the band, Joe Springer, piano, and Harold West, drums, complete the group. – Dizzie Gillespie, currently with John Kirby, was caught subbing for Page at a late session. His delivery as well as his ability to lift the entire band prove him thoroly entitled to his following among swing lovers. – A competent job is being done, individually, and as a combination. – Larry Nixon.” – Cf. August 1944: Herbie Nichols.

440714 Copyright entry of: “Bass man’s D-day; melody Oscar Pettiford. © 1 c. July 14, 1944; E unp. 382 407; Leeds music corp., New York. 26656.” – The Normandy Landings commenced on Tuesday, 6 June 1944 (D-Day). – Is this a retitled “For Bass Faces Only”?

440727 NYC. Coleman Hawkins All Stars. Coleman Hawkins ts, Charlie Shavers tp, Edmond Hall cl, Clyde Hart p, Tiny Grimes g, Oscar Pettiford b, Denzil Best d.

Regis 7002.

  • S 1177 All The Things You Are
  • S 1178 Shivers (previously unissued)
  • S 1179 Step On It
  • S 1180 It Had To Be You (unissued, master no longer exists)
  • S 1181 Riding On 52nd Street
  • S 1182 Memories Of You

Mosaic Box Classic Coleman Hawkins Sessions 1922-1947. – Except S 1178 & 1180 on: 6 Classic Tenors. EPM Musique FDC 5170, and on Classics 863. – S 1177 & 1181 first issued on Regis 7002, S 1179 & 1182 first issued on Manor 1036. S. below 440727*.

Pete Bainbridge found the unissued Shivers in Coover Gazdar’s collection. His description: “This is a bass feature which reminds me a little of ‘Pitter Panther Patter’, though it lacks its brilliance. The ensembles are rather lackluster – I can understand why it was not issued.” OP plays with great verve. Shivers is a composition in Ab Major by Charlie Christian. It was first recorded by the Benny Goodman Sextet in 1939.

440727* NYC. Oscar Pettiford b, Clyde Hart p. – [Coover Gazdar 44120 / Tom Lord P3431.] – Clyde Hart transcribed these bass solos to get them published at Leeds Music. But a Philhamonic lecturer classified them as absolutely unplayable. Cf. Dieter Salemann: Clyde Hart 1931-1945, p. 33, who found the matrix numbers.

  • S 1178 Don’t Blame Me
  • S 1180 Dedicated To J.B.

Rec. for Delta. – That would mean that the matrix numbers of the two unissued titles (s. above) were used once again. It is more probable that someone who did not know that Shivers exists drew a conclusion. Dieter Salemann swears that he did not invent the matrix numbers, but cannot remember the source. – Coover Gazdar: “No copies seem to exist.” – Max Harrison in Stanley Dance: Jazz Era. The Forties, p. 199: “An idea of his powers was given by the bass solos Dedicated To J.B. and Don’t Blame Me (Delta, 1944).”

In Charles Delaunay’s New Hot Discography from 1948 the entry reads:

OSCAR PETTIFORD (bass solos); acc by Clyde Hart (p). New York, 27 July 1944.

  • 10P1    Dedicated To J. B.             Delta
  • 10P2    Don’t Blame Me                    –

The numbers are “discode” numbers for identifying a selection in the book, no matrix numbers. If Delaunay had known the matrix numbers they would follow the selection’s title. Obviously he didn’t. Neither Coover Gazdar nor Tom Lord give matrix numbers.

? Good news? Paul Haynes in October, 2003: “… a bassist on the city’s underground jazz scene showed me a personal copy of his own but refused to play it. He claimed it was too precious for the grooves to be played.” (Continued 440922, 450117).

4408 Jazz Milieu. By Herbie Nichols. Music Dial, August 1944. “To my mind Johnny Hartzfield is the greatest phenomenon that I’ve heard since Lester Young first crossed the horizon.  He has been playing with Oscar Pettiford’s combination at the Onyx Club during the past few months. He is a great individual and is extremely sensitive to all of the modern jazz music played by the very few. What Johnny, Joe Guy and Oscar are playing these days is a melange of rich chords, rhythm and fire. What the average person may overlook is the fact that there is no such thing as a jazz school: no one graduates into good jazz. One has to cultivate extreme good taste and be especially observant and desirous of playing jazz on one’s instrument. […]

Pettiford is an interesting subject. For the type of work that he does at the Onyx he can’t be beaten. He has authored some excellent rhythmical arrangements for his small group, has a good sense of pitch and plays his bars very much in tune. It is a pity that Oscar plays the bass. Naturally he’s limited by his instrument. But I know that he’s a great jazzist because I’ve heard his arrangements.

There’s a lot of rhythm and melody in his gutbucket bass playing as he stomps loudly and hums his riffs. Yes, indeed, he’s quite an energetic fellow. Oscar’s bass style may be just a trifle profuse at times when it comes to his bluebook accompaniment in a jam combination. This criticism is very slight and is neither here nor there as far as most of us are concerned. A bass player has to be careful at times and play just the right contrapuntal notes to a theme. Usually it is a matter of choice of one or two notes which will hold the body of music together.

Joe Guy is a brilliant consistent trumpeter.  His style is great and very individual.  His liquid legato style on ballads is clear and rich. This fellow plays brilliant jazz in the same category as the master, “Dizzie” [Dizzy Gillespie].” Cf. 440610 and 441222.

4409 Tiny Grimes Trio. Tiny Grimes g, Clyde Hart p, Oscar Pettiford b. Cf. Shaw: 52nd Street p. 328: “The opening of Tondelayo’s in September, 1944, found Tiny fronting a trio that included pianist Clyde Hart and bassist OP, who was in between jobs of his own combo. The gig came at almost the same moment that Grimes landed a date on Savoy Records and called in Charlie Parker, who used to come into Tondelayo’s and jam with him.” – Scott DeVeaux: Bebop p. 370: „Parker began sitting in with the Grimes trio often enough to become a shadow member of the group, even staying around after hours to rehearse.”

440922 NYC. The Mildred Bailey Show. Bailey’s house band included Red Norvo vib, Teddy Wilson p, Remo Palmieri g, Al Hall b, Specs Powell d. – Oscar Pettiford was a guest.

  • Variations On Bass

Coover Gazdar p. 81: “Tape exists.” –

? Paul Haynes (continued from 440727*): “He did however let me hear the so called Variations On Bass … [a recording on  cassette]. What I heard was an unaccompanied bass solo that sounded very much like early Pettiford.” – Cf. 450117.

440925 NYC. Ike Quebec ts, Tyree Glenn tb, Roger Ramirez p, Tiny Grimes g, Oscar Pettiford b, J. C. Heard d.

  • BN989-0 Hard Tack                    BN 510
  • BN989-1 Hard Tack (alt.)
  • BN990-1 If I Had You                 BN 510
  • BN991-0 Mad About You           12 inch BN 42
  • BN992-0 Facin’ The Face (alt.)
  • BN992-1 Facin’ The Face            12 inch BN 42

The Complete Blue Note Forties Recordings of Ike Quebec and John Hardee. Mosaic 107. – Except alt. titles also on: Classics 957, and on: Swing Hi Swing Low. The Complete Blue Note / Savoy Masters. Definitive Records DRCD11135.

  • BN990-1 If I Had You
  • BN991-0 Mad About You

also on: Ike Quebec, Jimmy Hamilton, John Hardee, Benny Morton: Swing Hi – Swing Lo. Blue Note 6507.

441013 Downtown, Chicago. Boyd Raeburn & His Orchestra. The Billboard, October 21, 1944: “Boyd Raeburn’s trouble in organizing a good band seems to be over. Boyd has replaced with five new men, including Oscar Pettiford. Groups’ playing has improved considerably … Sidemen do good job on their specialties … and Pettiford coming in for a hot bass pounding of Flying Home.”

4411 ff. NYC. Spotlite Club (56. W. 52. St.) Spotlite House Band. Little Benny Harris tp, Budd Johnson ts, Oscar Pettiford b, leader, Dinny Dinofer / Stan Levey d. – Cf. Scott DeVeaux: Bebop p. 382 ff. – Cf. 441222.

441120 NYC. Helen Humes With Leonard Feather’s Hip-Tet. Helen Humes voc, Leonard Feather p, arr, Bobby Stark tp, Herbie Fields cl, as, Prince Robinson ts, Chuck Wayne g, Oscar Pettiford b, Denzil Best d.

  • S5745 I Would If I Could                 Savoy 5513
  • S5746 Keep Your Mind On Me       Savoy 5514
  • S5747 Fortune Tellin’ Man                Savoy 5513
  • S5748 Suspicious Blues                    Savoy 5514

E-Baba-Le-Ba. The Rhythm And Blues Years. Savoy WL 70824. – Also on: The Chronological Helen Humes 1927-1945. Classics 892.

441120 same. Del. Helen Humes; add Lloyd Thompson voc.

  • S5749 I Wonder

Savoy 5512.

441201 NYC. Leonard Feather’s All Stars. Buck Clayton tp, Edmond Hall cl, Coleman Hawkins ts, Leonard Feather p, Remo Palmieri g, Oscar Pettiford b, Specs Powell d. – Cf. Leonard Feather: “Goffin, Esquire, and the Moldy Figs”, in Robert Gottlieb (ed.): Reading Jazz.

  • 9001 Scram                     Continental 6016, Storyville (Dan) SLP819, (F) ST21029, Polydor (F/G) 423237, Xanadu 111
  • 9002 Esquire Stomp         Continental 6009, Xanadu 111
  • 9003 Esquire Jump           Continental 6009, Storyville (Dan) SLP819, (F) ST21029, Polydor (G/F) 423237, Xanadu 111
  • 9004 Thanks For The Memory     Continental 6016, LP16006, Storyville (Dan) SLP818, ( F) ST21029, Polydor (G/F) 423236, Xanadu 111, Black &Blue (F)33009

The Continental Sessions Volume 3. Storyville 101 8339. Carl Powell is named as a second bassist on 9001 & 9002.

Note: „Esquire Stomp” as „Comes The Don” on Storyville (F)ST21029 and Polydor 423237. „Thanks For The Memory” as „When The Day Is Done” on Polydor 423237 and as „When day is done” on Polydor 423236

  • 9003 Esquire Jump
  • 9004 Thanks For The Memory

Jazz Jam Session. Palace PST-675. – Six Faces of Jazz. An Historic Jam Session. Ember CJSCD 826.

441219 Clyde Hart’s Hot Seven. Benny Harris tp, Herbie Fields as, ts, Budd Johnson ts, Clyde Hart p, arr, Chuck Wayne g, Oscar Pettiford b, Denzil Best d. Joe Gregory voc*.

  • S 5768 Smack That Mess*
  • S 5769 Dee Dee’s Dance
  • S 5770 Little Benny
  • S 5771 Shoot The Arrow To Me Cupid*

The vocal recordings were first published on Savoy 542, the instrumental recordings on Savoy 598. – The complete session is on: The Changing Face of Harlem. The Savoy Sessions. Savoy SJL 2208, and on: Budd Johnson 1944-1952. Classics (F) 1307. – Dee Dee’s Dance also on: Oscar Pettiford: Bass Hits. Topaz 1071. – Joseph Scott: “‘Dee Dee’s Dance’ and ‘Little Benny’ are arguably the very first recordings anyone made of bebop for issue on a regular 78.” – Little Benny also known as Crazeology, Ideology, Bud’s Bubble.

  1. The Billboard. “Spotlite Club, New York. … Oscar Pettiford’s little band – Clyde Hart on piano, Bud Johnson on tenor sax, “Dinny” Dinofer on drums, Benny Harris on trumpet and Pettiford on bass, of course – has the makings of a nifty outfit, for there’s plenty of talent and musicianship scattered among the crew. Unfortunately, for dancing or just listening they are too wild, too rough and, as a crew, unjelled. Playing the show, tho, they calm down. …Ork returns then, giving Pettiford the chance to display his strumming-thumping wizardry on Body and Soul, a swell job and a good mitt-yanker.”

441222 or 29 NYC. Broadcast. The Mildred Bailey Show. With Mildred Bailey and Paul Baron and His Orchestra, and a sextet of Cootie Williams tp, Red Norvo vib, Teddy Wilson p, Remo Palmieri g, Oscar Pettiford b, Specs Powell d (the winners of the 1945 Esquire All-American Jazz Poll). The sextet played:

  • Tea For Two

Teddy Wilson. Jazz Archives JA 36. – Teddy Wilson: Interaction. Drive DE2-41094. –  Joseph Scott: “According to the book ‘Teddy Wilson Talks Jazz’, on Dec. 29, ’44, a quartet of CW, TW, OP, and RN recorded ‘Tea For Two’ …” – According to J. David Goldin’s entry 20552 The Mildred Bailey Show of December 29, 1944, Program #13, of CBS net origination, was an AFRS rebroadcast. Lord reverses the order: he has the CBS broadcast Music Till Midnight on 441229 (Lord B291.710-5), and The Mildred Bailey Show on 441222 (Lord W7576-5). – Cf. also Coover Gazdar 44190 and p. 81: 440922. – A fine photo of the sextet is in Wolfram Knauer’s book “Duke Ellington und die Folgen” p. 199. – Cf. below: before 451008.

45 OP wins the Esquire Magazine Gold Award and the Metronome poll.

450109 NYC. Oscar Pettiford & His 18 All Stars. Featuring Dizzy Gillespie and Don Byas. Big band including Dizzy Gillespie tp, Trummy Young, Benny Morton tb, Johnny Bothwell as, Don Byas ts, Serge Chaloff bs, Clyde Hart p, Oscar Pettiford b, Al Casey g, Shelly Manne d, Rubberlegs Williams voc*. – Cf. Scott DeVeaux: The Birth of Bebop p. 415. –

Clyde Hart’s All Stars had been recorded on January 4, 1945: Dizzy Gillespie tp, Trummy Young tb, voc, Charlie Parker as, Don Byas bs, Clyde Hart p, Mike Bryan g, Al Hall b, Specs Powell d, Rubberlegs Williams voc. A hangover of this crew coupled with musicians from Boyd Raeburn’s entourage seem to have formed Oscar’s unit.

Research by Phil Schaap results in the statement: the presence of  the  musicians named below can be confirmed, while the additional names listed by Xanadu LP 124 et. al. (Bill Coleman, Little Benny Harris, Vic Dickenson, Al Casey and Serge Chaloff) can not. This does not necessarily mean that these musicians were absent; listing Casey e.g. remains plausible from all perspectives, but is not finitely documented. – Another correction by Phil Schaap: “Empty Bed Blues” is by J.C.Johnson and, despite the label credit on the Manor 78, should not be attributed as an Oscar Pettiford composition. – Ira Gitler (Swing to Bop p. 151) asked Shelly Manne who remembered the session well. Serge Chaloff and Al Casey were present. So I added them in the list above. –

Phil Schaap’s result is identical with Delaunay’s entry in his “New Hot Discography” from 1948: Big band including Dizzy Gillespie tp, Trummy Young, Benny Morton tb, Johnny Bothwell as, Don Byas ts, Clyde Hart p, Oscar Pettiford b, Shelly Manne d, Rubberlegs Williams voc*.

Manor 1034 (78 RPM). – Blue Star (F) BSN 120 (78 RPM).

Manor 1002 (78 RPM). – Coover Gazdar 45010, Tom Lord P 3432 and Classics 888 have Something For You & Worried Life Blues on Manor 1034, Empty Bed Blues (part 1) & Empty Bed Blues (part 2) on Manor 1002. In fact Manor 1002 combines Worried Life Blues & Empty Bed Blues (part 1), and Manor 1034 has Something For You & Empty Bed Blues (part 2). – Cf. the LOC (Library of Congress) collection of 78s listed online.

Bebop Revisited, Vol 2. Xanadu 124. – Dizzy Gillespie 1945. Classics 888. –  Except Worried Life Blues also on: Dizzy Gillespie. Volume 5. 1945. Media 7 / Masters of Jazz MJCD 110. – Except Something For You also on: Obscure Blues Shouters Vol. 2. Rubberlegs Williams / Bubber Cyphers / Walter “Sandman” Howard / Sherman “Blues” Johnson. Blue Moon Blues Series BMCD 6011.

  • W-1218 Something For You

Also on: Oscar Pettiford: Bass Hits. Topaz 1071.

450109 NYC. Dizzy Gillespie Sextet. Dizzy Gillespie tp, Trummy Young tb, Don Byas ts, Clyde Hart p, Oscar Pettiford b, Shelly Manne d. – Ira Gitler argues that Irv Kluger was the drummer: Jazz Masters of the Forties (later called The Masters of Bebop) p. 75.

Manor 1042. – Columbia 30147. – Mark Cederquist is sharing his original 78rpm recordings on YouTube. The Columbia “Special Record for Radio Stations” 30147 (CO 40137) is a real discovery.

Manor 5000. – Find here a Transcription of the bass line of  Be Bop by Marc Accattatis.

All four titles on: Dizzy Gillespie 1945. Classics 888. – Dizzy Gillespie. Volume 5. 1945. Media 7 / Masters of Jazz MJCD 110.

? What happened to W-1222 ? While Classics 888, Gazdar, and Lord have the matrix numbers as above, MJCD 110 has: W 1222 I Can’t Get Started, W 1223 Good Bait, W 1224 Salt Peanuts, W 1225 Be Bop! Naxos: Dizzy Gillespie “Groovin’ High”. Original Recordings 1942-1949, too, gives us I CAN’T GET STARTED on Manor 1042 as mx W 1222, and GOOD BAIT as mx W 1223; but this is an error. LOC has W-1223 I CAN’T GET STARTED, and W-1224 GOOD BAIT, as this is what can be read on the labels.

  • Good Bait
  • Salt Peanuts
  • Be Bop

Oscar Pettiford: Bass Hits. Topaz 1071.

  • I Can’t Get Started
  • Good Bait

Dizzy Gillespie Small Groups. Jazz Portraits 14554.

  • Salt Peanuts
  • I Can’t Get Started

Ken Burns Jazz: Dizzy Gillespie. Verve 549 086-2.

450117 Boyd Raeburn and His Orchestra. Boyd Raeburn ld, bs, ts, ss; J. B. Gillespie, Stan Fishelson, T. D. Allison, Benny Harris tp, J. K. Corman, O. C. Wilson, tb, W. C. Robertson tb, tp, John Bothwell, A.W. McCusick as, A. Cohn, Joe Megro ts, Serge Chaloff bs, Steve P. Jordan g, O. Pettiford b, S. Manne d. Don Darcy, M. Hoffman (married name of Marjorie (Margie) Wood) voc. – Recorded for Lang-Worth Transcriptions in Liederkranz Hall, New York City.

  • Who’s To Answer? Arr. by George Williams
  • Sequence. Written & arr. by Milt Kleeb
  • Solitude. Arr. by Milt Kleeb
  • Blue Moon. Arr. by Milt Kleeb
  • I’ll Always Be In Love With You. Arr. by Milt Kleeb
  • Lonely Serenade. Written & arr. by George Melachrino
  • Barefoot Boy With Cheek. Composed & arr. by Ralph Burns or Tadd Dameron
  • Summertime. Arr. by George Williams
  • Interlude (A Night In Tunisia). Vocal version. Don Darcy voc. Probably arr. by George Williams

Boyd Raeburn and His Orchestra, 1944-1945. Circle CCD-113. Liner notes “My Dad’s Band” by Bruce Raeburn. – As to “Barefoot Boy With Cheek”: Ian McDonald does not mention this composition in his exhausting study “Tadd. The Life and Legacy of Taddly Ewing Dameron”. Trusting my own ears I’d say that especially the writing for brass is not in Dameron’s style. It is more likely by Ralph Burns. – Barefoot Boy With Cheek and Interlude also on: Dizzy Gillespie. Volume 5. 1945. Media 7 / Masters of Jazz MJCD 110.

Hal McCusick recalls: “Oscar Pettiford also was in the band. We were roommates on the road. He was a great guy but was tough to handle when he drank, and he drank often. Benny Harris and I had to hold him down many times. Oscar was way into the music, and we shared a lot of it together. He was a good buddy. I was very taken with his playing and honored to share private time with him. We’d talk music. It was so sad how he died. He loved riding his bike, and one day in 1960 he was riding stoned and hit a curb in Copenhagen. He went over the handlebars and never recovered.”

A documentary about Boyd Raeburn

450117 NYC. Broadcast. 2nd Esquire Jazz Concert. – Oscar Pettiford b, accompanied by a big band.

  • Variations On Bass

Cf. 440922.

450124 Radio Broadcast. Liederkranz Hall, NYC. Boyd Raeburn and His Orchestra.

  • Jumpin’ For Maria
  • Is You Is Or Is You Ain’t My Baby (unissued)

Dizzy Gillespie Vol. 5. Media 7 / Masters of Jazz (France) MJCD 110. – Alain Tercinet in his liner notes: “… the remarkable Jumpin’ For Maria, published here for the first time (thanks to Coover D. Gazdar).” The CD appeared in 1996. Coover Gazdar’s “First Bass. The Oscar Pettiford Discography” had been published in 1991. – Joseph Scott: “Raeburn’s bassist as of Jan. 24 is still probably Pettiford (and it certainly sounds like him).” – If Is You Is Or Is You Ain’t My Baby is from the same aircheck, as Coover Gazdar 44200 suggests, it must be included here, too.

450126 Boyd Raeburn and His Orchestra. “Featuring Dizzy Gillespie and Oscar Pettiford”. Boyd Raeburn ld, bass-s; Dizzy Gillespie, Stan Fishelson, Tommy Allison, Benny Harris tp, Jack Carmen, Ollie Wilson, Trummy Young tb, Walter Robertson tb, tp, Johnny Bothwell, Hal McCusick as, Al Cohn, Joe Megro ts, Serge Chaloff bs, Ike Carpenter p, Steve Jordan g, Oscar Pettiford b, Shelly Manne d. Don Darcy voc. [Cf. Coover Gazdar 44200.]

Guild 107. 78 rpm, mono, 10-inch, in: Voice of America Music Library Collection (Library of Congress). – A Night In Tunisia is available on Ken Burns Jazz: Dizzy Gillespie. Verve 549 086-2.

450126-27 Boyd Raeburn and His Orchestra.

Guild 111. 78 rpm, mono, 10-inch.

450126-27 Boyd Raeburn and His Orchestra.

  • G 545 I Wanna Get Married*
  • G 542 Interlude (A Night In Tunisia).
  • G 543 March Of The Boyds
  • G 549 Summertime

Experiments In Big Band Jazz. Musicraft MVSCD-65. – Except* also on: Boyd Meets Stravinsky. Savoy Jazz SV-0185. – Interlude and March Of The Boyds also on: Dizzy Gillespie Vol. 5. Media 7 / Masters of Jazz (France) MJCD 110.

Joseph Scott discusses the matter: “Eight tunes that Raeburn recorded for the Guild label in late Jan. ’45, possibly on Jan. 26 and 27, are available (in not very good sound) on the 1990 CD ‘Experiments In Big Band Jazz’ on the Musicraft label, MVSCD-65. These tunes were reportedly recorded over two days, and Pettiford and Mickey Mendi have both been credited of playing bass, depending of the source consulted. I Wanna Get Married is worth checking out for its short solos on bass that imo are obviously Pettiford. Three of the eight tunes, Interlude (aka Night In Tunisia), March Of The Boyds, and Summertime, have been issued in better sound (better than on the Musicraft CD, that is), on the 1992 CD ‘Boyd Meets Stravinsky’, Savoy Jazz SV-0185.” – Coover Gazdar 44200: “Jepsen, Vol. 6 states that OP is replaced by Mickey Mendi on all titles except Night In Tunisia.” – So here is the complete Guild session:

450126-27 Boyd Raeburn and His Orchestra.

G 542 Interlude (A Night In Tunisia) Guild 107
G 543 March Of The Boyds Guild 111
G 544 Prisoner Of Love Guild 104
G 545 I Wanna Get Married Guild 104
G 546 I Didn’t Know About You Guild 107
G 547 I Promised You Guild 108
G 548 This Heart Of Mine Guild 108
G 549 Summertime Guild 111

Experiments In Big Band Jazz. Musicraft MVSCD-65. – Musicraft LP 505.

Musicraft 489.

450203 Club Marquee, Los Angeles. All American Quintet. Vic Dickenson tb, Willie Smith as, Eddie Heywood p, Les Paul g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sidney Catlett d.

  • Just you, just me
  • I’ve found a new baby

Jubilee 119, Jazum LP3, Black Jack (G)3003. According to The Jubilee Transcriptions by Rainer E. Lotz this is from AFRS Jubilee No. 119*. Studios: NBC, Hollywood. Pre-recording dates: January 1945. Date of dubbing: February 5, 1945. This program was re-issued on Jubilee No. 215.

450211 Elks Hall, Central Avenue, Los Angeles. The Coleman Hawkins band, featuring Howard McGhee on trumpet, Sir Charles Thompson on piano, Oscar Pettiford on bass, and Denzil Best on drums, plays a dance.

[450212 NYC. Johnny Bothwell and his Orchestra. Tommy Allison, Benny Harris, Stan Fishelson tp, Ollie Wilson, Walter Robertson, Trummy Young, Jack Carmen tb, Hal McKusick, Johnny Bothwell as, Al Cohn, Joe Megro ts, Serge Chaloff bs, Boyd Raeburn bass-sax,  Ike Carpenter p, Steve Jordan g, not Oscar Pettiford b, Shelly Manne d. George Handy arr*. – This is Boyd Raeburn’s orchestra under the nominal leadership of Johnny  Bothwell. – A correction by Joseph Scott: Pettiford is not the bassist on the Johnny Bothwell 2-12-45 and 5/6-45 recordings. They were made with Raeburn’s band in New York while Pettiford was in Los Angeles. – Cf. Lord B6540-5.

  • SRC110-3A I’ll Remember April*    Signature 15003, Brunswick 80176 (SRC 110)
  • SRC111-F   Street Of Dreams         Signature 15012-B, Brunswick 80176 (SRC 111)

Presenting Johnny Bothwell and his Orchestra. Instrumental Fox Trots. Brunswick BL 58033 (1953 10″ LP).]

450223 Los Angeles, CA. Coleman Hawkins ts, ld, Howard McGhee tp, Vic Dickenson tb, Allan Reuss g, Sir Charles Thompson p, Oscar Pettiford b, Denzil Best d. [Coover Gazdar 45040 has 450302]

  • mx 573 April In Paris
  • mx 574 Rifftide
  • mx 575 Stardust
  • mx 576 Stuffy*

Coleman Hawkins: The Hollywood Sessions (1945). Ocium (Spain) OCM 0008. – Hollywood Stampede. Capitol CD: CDP7 92596 2. – Capitol LP 12″: LP11030. – *also on: Ken Burns Jazz: Coleman Hawkins. Verve 549 085-2.

450223 Los Angeles, CA. Coleman Hawkins & His Orch. Howard McGhee tp, Vic Dickenson tb, Coleman Hawkins ts, Sir Charles Thompson p, Alan Reuss g, Oscar Pettiford b, Denzil Best d. – [Cf. Scott DeVeaux: Bebop p. 398 ff. Coover Gazdar 45040 has 450302.]

  • mx 585-2B Hollywood Stampede      Capitol Criterion 10036
  • mx 586-3B I’m Thru With Love         Capitol Criterion 10036
  • mx 587 What Is There To Say
  • mx 588 Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams*

Coleman Hawkins: The Hollywood Sessions (1945). Ocium (Spain) OCM 0008. – Hollywood Stampede. Capitol CD: CDP7 92596 2 – Capitol LP 12″: LP11030. – *Also on: Oscar Pettiford: Bass Hits. Topaz 1071.

4502/03 (ca) Los Angeles, CA. Coleman Hawkins Quintet. Coleman Hawkins ts, Howard McGhee tp, Sir Charles Thompson p,  Oscar Pettiford b, Denzil Best d.

  • Hollywood Stampede

Hot Jazz on Film Volume 4. Extreme Rarities 1008. – Hollywood Stampede is played live in a scene of the film The Crimson Canary, a 1945 John Hoffman musical crime mystery starring Noah Beery Jr., Lois Collier, John Litel, plus musicians Coleman Hawkins, Oscar Pettiford, Josh White, and Christine McIntyre. “Reveil weird orgies in downtown nightclub. Accuse jazz cult. Death sounds trumpet at fatal jam session.”  Pete Bainbridge: ” ‘Hollywood Stampede’ from the film soundtrack of ‘The Crimson Canary’  …  This is not the studio recording. I have seen a very poor transfer of the film, and it appears to have been recorded live in a nightclub setting, complete with ambient noises and applause.  OP takes a nice solo (which sounds edited to me).  Although the visual was not good, it was a treat to watch him playing.” – You Tube offers this scene.

4503 LA Coleman Hawkins Quintet. Coleman Hawkins ts, Howard McGhee tp, Sir Charles Thompson p, Oscar Pettiford b, Denzil Best d. MC: Ernie „Bubbles” Whitman.

  • Mop Mop*
  • Body And Soul

Coleman Hawkins: The Hollywood Sessions (1945). Ocium (Spain) OCM 0008. – Jubilee Broadcast No. 122. Spotlite LP 119, Musidisc LP 4205. – The Great Tenors. Jazz Anthology JA 5205. – *also on: Oscar Pettiford: Bass Hits. Topaz 1071. – According to The Jubilee Transcriptions byRainer E. Lotz this is from AFRS Jubilee No. 122*. Studios: NBC, Hollywood. Pre-recording dates: February 1945. Date of dubbing: February 26, 1945. This program was re-issued on Jubilee No. 218.

45 (after a couple of months w. Coleman Hawkins’ band) OP founded his own trio in San Diego, CA, with Spaulding Givens p, and Charles (Chuck) Norris g. They worked in California and Nevada about five months, then Oscar joined Duke Ellington.

[45 May / June NYC. Johnny Bothwell and his Orchestra. Tommy Allison, Benny Harris, Stan Fishelson tp, Ollie Wilson, Walter Robertson, Rodney Roberts, Jack Carmen tb, Hal McKusick, Johnny Bothwell as, Al Cohn, Joe Megro ts, Serge Chaloff bs,  Ike Carpenter p, Steve Jordan g, notOscar Pettiford b, Shelly Manne d. George Handy arr*, George Williams arr.** – A correction by Joseph Scott: Pettiford is not the bassist on the Johnny Bothwell 2-12-45 and 5/6-45 recordings. They were made with Raeburn’s band in New York while Pettiford was in Los Angeles. – Cf. Lord B6541-5.

SRC126-F Laura Signature 15001-B
SRC127-F Lonely Serenade Signature 15001-A
SRC128-F3A Ill Wind* Signature 15003
SRC135-F3A John’s Other Wife** Signature 15002
SRC136-F3A The Trouble With Me Is You* Signature 15002
SRC146-F2A I Cover The Waterfront* Signature 15012-A

Except Lonely Serenade and John’s Other Wife also on: Presenting Johnny Bothwell and his Orchestra. Instrumental Fox Trots.  Brunswick BL 58033 (1953 10″ LP)]

450728 The Billboard p. 28: “Oscar Pettiford Fronts Own Trio. – Hollywood, July 23. Local Frederick Bros. cocktail department, with Milo Stelt and Floyd Bates, has just signed Oscar Pettiford, Esquire jazz contest winner in the bass division. Pettiford will front a trio consisting of his own bass, a guitar and piano. Group has plenty of vocals in the books in addition to instrumentals. Stelt and Bates are really backing trio as they expect it to become one of cocktail’s biggest names since Pettiford has gained so much attention as an instrumentalist.”

4509 Los Angeles. Wynonie “Blues” Harris with Oscar Pettiford & his All Stars. Wynonie Harris voc; unknown tp, Jack McVea ts,  unknown p, possibly Gene Phillips g, Oscar Pettiford b, unknown d. [Coover Gazdar 45070 has 451113]

S-1135 I Gotta Lyin’ Woman Apollo 387
S-1136 Rebecca’s Blues Apollo 387
S-1137 Everybody’s Boogie Apollo 378
S-1138 Time To Change Your Town Apollo 378
I Gotta Lyin’ Woman (alt. take) Delmark DE-683
Everybody’s Boogie (alt. take) Delmark DE-683

Wynonie Harris: Rockin’ the Blues. Properbox 20.

OP’s plays stunnung solos on Apollo 378. But his maturity as a leader, arranger, and partner (to avoid the term “accompanist”, as it does not fit OP’s concept of the role of the bass) is equally remarkable.

4509 or 10 Estelle Edson with Oscar Pettiford & His All Stars. Oscar Pettiford b, Karl George tp, Jewell Grant as, Lucky Thompson ts, Leon Beck bs, Wilbert Baranco p, Chuck Norris g, Roy Porter d, Estelle Edson voc.

  • BW 163 Be Baba Le Ba
  • BW 164 Rhythm In A Riff

Black & White 760.

Black and White 761.

*also on Oscar Pettiford: Bass Hits. Topaz 1071, and on Lucky Thompson: The Beginning Years. IAJRC CD-1001. – BW 164 and 166 also on Lucky Thompson: Smooth Sailing. Indigo IGO CD 2104. – Topas 1071 says that it was recorded 4610; Coover Gazdar has 46. I am following Joseph Scott: “Black & White assigned their master numbers in chronological order, and BW163 through BW166 are late ’45 numbers. (E.g. the Spirits of Rhythm’s Jan. ’45 session was BW75 through BW80, and Wilbert Baranco’s Jan. ’46 session was BW183 through BW186.) – Incidentally, Estelle Edson is probably best-known for leading the fight to desegregate the Los Angeles musicians’ unions in the early ’50s.” – BW 163, 165, 166 also on the CD: Boppers And The Blues. Acrobat ACRCD 153, 2002.

NOTE: The Italian CD Moon 081-2 (Howard McGhee: Cool Fantasy) claims that OP is playing on these recordings:

  • Mad Hype
  • 11:45 Swing (Rummage Bounce)
  • Play Boy Blues (Pearl Taylor, vocal)
  • Around The Clock – Part 1 (Pearl Taylor, vocal)
  • Around The Clock – Part 2 (Pearl Taylor, vocal)
  • Gee, I’m Lonesome (Pearl Taylor, vocal)
  • Call It The Blues (Estelle Edson, vocal)

They say that this is Howard McGhee & His Orchestra; Howard McGhee tp, Teddy Edwards, James King ts, Vernon Biddle p, Oscar Pettiford b, Roy Porter d, Pearl Taylor, Estelle Edson voc. Los Angeles, c. December 1945.

Jepsen and Lord add two recordings (and singer Clarence Williams):

  • The Jive I Like (Pearl Taylor, vocal)
  • I’m Drunk (Clarence Williams, vocal)

Jepsen gives the same personnel, but leaves James King out. The date: LA, 1946. He adds a note: “Although these titles are generally known as to be by McGhee, it is not certain that the above band are playing on all titles.”

Lord has Bob Kesterson instead of OP. The date: Hollywood, September 1945.

The Tom Archia Discography says: “In November 1945 (listed as December in discographies, but “11:45 Blues” and the presence of Oscar Pettiford, who was about to split to join the Duke Ellington band, a band of McGhee, Edwards, Biddle, Pettiford, and Porter, plus vocalists, cut seven more sides for Modern.”

Delauney’s New Hot Discography of 1948 gives no date:

  • 11:45 Swing
  • Play Boy Blues (Pearl Taylor, vocal)
  • Around The Clock – Part 1 & 2 (Pearl Taylor, vocal)
  • Gee, I’m Lonesome (Pearl Taylor, vocal)
  • Call It The Blues (Estelle Edson, vocal)
  • The Jive I Like (Pearl Taylor, vocal)
  • I’m Drunk (Clarence Williams, vocal)

Howard McGhee & His Orch.: Unknown personnel. Pearl Taylor, Estelle Edson, Clarence Williams voc.

These recordings were made for one label, and they had in common that the personnel was unknown. That is why D. could gather them in the way he did. But of course these recordings were made during several sessions. They are featuring different singers. There are possibly two bassists: maybe OP on the Pearl Taylor titles (I am not convinced), Bob Kesterson on all others. As OP is NOT playing on “11:45 Swing” there is no reason to date all of these sessions to November 1945. For the Pearl Taylor session we can follow Lord (except for the bassist, maybe). A commentary by Pete Bainbridge: “I can’t tell if it’s OP or not, and given the nature of the music it’s more of academic interest than anything else, at least to my ears.”

  1. 4509 Hollywood. Howard McGhee & His Orchestra; Howard McGhee tp, Teddy Edwards, James King ts, Vernon Biddle p, (Oscar Pettiford or) Bob Kesterson b, Roy Porter d; Pearl Taylor voc.
  • Play Boy Blues (Pearl Taylor, vocal)                             Modern Music 120
  • Around The Clock – Part 1 & 2 (Pearl Taylor, vocal)    Modern Music 124
  • Gee, I’m Lonesome (Pearl Taylor, vocal)                       Modern Music 125
  • The Jive I Like (Pearl Taylor, vocal)                              Modern Music 127

Howard McGhee: Cool Fantasy. Moon 081-2.

before 451008 Hollywood, CA. Oscar Pettiford Trio. Oscar Pettiford b, Spaulding Givens p, Chuck Norris g. – Coover Gazdar 45080 has: “poss. Clyde Hart”; “likely Tiny Grimes” for Tea For Two, “likely Chuck Wayne” for Body & Soul. 451118.  

  • Tea For Two

The Best of the AFRS Jubilee Vol. 6. No 45 & 151. – RST Records (Au) JUBCD1006-2.

Coover Gazdar 45080 has 451118; but he has OP with DE in NYC at the same time (Coover Gazdar DE020, Desor 4591). –  Joseph Scott found out that “AFRS ‘Jubilee’ #151 was reportedly dubbed on Oct. 8, ’45, so the Pettiford Trio recording of ‘Tea For Two’ would be from some time between Pettiford leaving Hawk’s employ (presumably) and Oct. 8. (AFRS recorded material for ‘Jubilee’ in the studio in advance, and then edited it together for shows they saw fit, often adding phony applause.)” – Joseph continues, discussing the personnel of the session: “Clyde Hart died in March 1945, and I know of no evidence that Clyde Hart or Chuck Wayne set foot in California during 1944 or 1945. So if it was recorded in California during 1945 as one would reasonably guess, ‘unknown’ is where we stand on the pianist and guitarist I think, until someone does research on exactly what OP was doing in L.A. in 1945 for about seven months … between leaving Hawk and joining Duke, e.g. did he lead a trio that played in L.A. clubs, and are the other musicians mentioned in newspaper article(s)/ad(s) of the time, or…? (There is a small possibility that Pettiford made a trio recording for ‘Jubilee’ in New York in 1944 or early 1945, because ‘Jubilee’ occasionally recorded in New York, but the vast majority of their material they recorded in California.)” – According to The Jubilee Transcriptions by Richard S. Sears this is from AFRS Jubilee No. 151*.Studios: NBC, Hollywood. Pre-recording dates: c. October 1945. Date of dubbing: October 8, 1945.

The tight piano-guitar style is certainly not that of Clyde Hart and Chuck Wayne. At the time OP had a trio with Spaulding Givens p, and Chuck Norris g. –

About the political background of the AFRS ‘Jubilee’ show cf. Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff: “Variety for the Servicemen: The Jubilee Show and the Paradox of Racializing Radio during World War II” in: American Quarterly. December 2004. Volume 56, No. 4.

451015 LA. [Jubilee Broadcast No 152] Jubilee All Stars. Harry Parr Jones tp, Willie Smith as, Corky Corcoran ts, Cal Jackson p, Oscar Pettiford b, Miguelito Valdez perc, Pepe Marrero conga, unknown d, perc.

  • How High The Moon

Start To Jump Because It’s Jubilee. Swingtime ST 1009. – – According to The Jubilee Transcriptions by Rainer E. Lotz this is from AFRS Jubilee No. 152*. Studios: NBC, Hollywood. Pre-recording dates: October 1945. Date of dubbing: October 15, 1945.

451015 Los Angeles, CA. [Jubilee Broadcast No 152] Johnny Otis & His Orch. And The Jubilee All Stars. Johnny Otis d; prob. personnel: Lester Current, Loyal Walker, Eddie Preston, Billy Jones, Harry Parr Jones tp, John Pettigrew, Jap Jones, George Washington tb, Kenneth Pope, Bob Harris, Willie Smith as, Paul Quinichette, Corky Corcoran, James Van Streeter ts, Leon Beck bs, Henry Owens, Cal Jackson p, Bernie Cobbs g, Curtis Counce, Oscar Pettiford b, Ivie Anderson, Big Joe Turner voc.

  • How High The Moon

Jam Session Blues:

  • Empty Bed Blues (Ivie Anderson voc)
  • Love My Baby (Joe Turner voc)
  • Improvised Blues

Start To Jump Because It’s Jubilee. Swingtime (Germany) ST 1009. – A mutilated issue of Jam Session Blues is on Disc A of the CD box set “Midnight At The Barrelhouse” on the JSP label. Joseph Scott: “What JSP did was include only part of the 10:00 track – they fade it out after Turner is done singing, which is a little more than 4 minutes in (and then they sloppily credited the track to Ivie but not Joe).”

451020, 451027, 451110 Los Angeles Times: “Lew Le Roy’s Swanee Inn, 133 N. La Brea – WY9398. … Oscar Pettiford Trio, Esquire’s No. 1 Bass Player… No Cover, No Minimum. Continuous Entertainment.”

451113 Hollywood, CA. Oscar Pettiford Trio. Oscar Pettiford b, Spaulding Givens p, Chuck Norris g. –

  • Body & Soul (unreleased)

According to The Jubilee Transcriptions by Rainer E. Lotz this is from AFRS Jubilee No. 156*. Studios: NBC, Hollywood. Pre-recording dates: November 1945. Date of dubbing: November 13, 1945

451117 NYC. ABC broadcast: “Your Saturday Date With The Duke”. Duke Ellington & His Orch. Rex Stewart c, Cat Anderson, Shelton Hemphill, Taft Jordan tp, Lawrence Brown, Wilbur DeParis, Claude Jones tb, Jimmy Hamilton cl, ts, Otto Hardwick, Johnny Hodges as, Al Sears ts, Harry Carney cl, bs, bass-cl, D.E. p, Billy Strayhorn° p, Fred Guy g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sonny Greer d, Joya Sherrill* voc. The Mellotones** voc.

  • Take The “A” Train (theme)
  • Walkin’ With My Honey
  • Jack The Bear
  • Autumn Serenade°*
  • D.E. Bond Promo°
  • Tell It To A Star°
  • The Cat And The Fiddle° **
  • I Can’t Begin To Tell You
  • How Deep Is The Ocean

D.E.T.S. 31. – The MC: “This next number by Duke Ellington and the orchestra introduces a new musician in Duke Ellington’s band: Oscar Pettiford, bass. But not a new musician to music, because he happens to be the 1945 award winner on the bass. So we’re always happy to have the man with the gold cup shining in his hand. So here is Oscar Pettiford and Duke Ellington’s orchestra, and Jack The Bear.”

  • The Wonder Of You°*
  • Victory Drive*
  • As Long As I Live
  • Take The “A” Train (theme)

D.E.T.S 32.

451118 Hollywood, CA. AFRS “Jubilee” ‘151 see 451008

451118 NYC, Zanzibar Restaurant. Duke Ellington & His Orch. Rex Stewart c, Cat Anderson, Shelton Hemphill, Taft Jordan tp, Lawrence Brown, Wilbur DeParis, Claude Jones tb, Jimmy Hamilton cl, ts, Otto Hardwick, Johnny Hodges as, Al Sears ts, Harry Carney cl, bs, D.E. p, Fred Guy g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sonny Greer d, Al Hibbler, Joya Sherrill voc. [Coover Gazdar DE020, Desor 4591] CD says: Junior Raglin, Oscar Pettiford b. Desor does not mention Junior Raglin. – CD says 450918; *451007. Correct is for Let The Zoomers Drool*: 451024 [Desor 4583k]; that means: Junior Raglin is on bass, not OP. This track fades out before Harry Carney’s solo. – CD has: Ray Nance tp & violin; Desor does not mention RN.

  • Take The “A” Train
  • As Long As I Live
  • Nine-Twenty Special
  • The Wonder Of You
  • Walkin’ With My Honey
  • Three Cent Stomp
  • Don’t Take Your Love From Me
  • Court Session
  • Emancipation Celebration
  • Let The Zoomers Drool*

D.E.T.S. Duke Ellington’s Treasury Shows Vol. 5. D.E.T.S. 903 9005.

451119 „OP… took over on bass from Lloyd Trotman… He was to be with Ellington until March of 1948.” Stratemann: Duke Ellington Day By Day p. 264. – Desor p. 1486: “Stay in the band: November 17, 1945 – Spring 1948.”

451121 NYC. Jimmy Hamilton and The Duke’s Men. Ray Nance tp, Henderson Chambers tb, Jimmy Hamilton cl, Otto Hardwick cl, Harry Carney cl, bs, Jimmy Jones p, Oscar Pettiford b, Sidney Catlett d.

  • BN268-1 Old uncle Bud
  • BN269-4 Blues For Clarinets
  • BN270-0 Slapstick
  • BN271-1 Blues in My Music Room

The Benny Morton and Jimmy Hamilton Blue Note Swingtets. Mosaic MR1-115.

451124 NYC. ABC broadcast: “Your Saturday Date With The Duke”. Duke Ellington & His Orch. Rex Stewart c, Cat Anderson, Shelton Hemphill, Taft Jordan tp, Lawrence Brown, Wilbur DeParis, Claude Jones tb, Jimmy Hamilton cl, ts, Otto Hardwick, Johnny Hodges as, Al Sears ts, Harry Carney cl, bs, bass-cl, D.E. p, Billy Strayhorn° p, Fred Guy g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sonny Greer d, Joya Sherrill*, Kay Davis**, Al Hibbler°° voc. The Mellotones*** voc.

  • Take The “A” Train (theme)
  • Way Low
  • C-Jam Blues
  • Kissing Bug*
  • D.E. Bond Promo
  • Just A-Sittin’ and A’Rockin’ (instrumental)
  • Caldonia***
  • Fancy Dan
  • I’m Just A Lucky So And So°°
  • Take The “A” Train (theme)
  • Take The “A” Train (theme)
  • The Last Time I Saw You
  • On The Atcheson, Topeka and Santa Fe
  • D.E. Bond Promo°
  • If I Loved You** ° (duet)
  • I Can’t Begin To Tell You
  • The Wonder Of You*
  • Riff ‘n’ Drill

D.E.T.S. 32.

451126 NYC. Duke Ellington & His Orch. Rex Stewart c, Cat Anderson, Shelton Hemphill, Taft Jordan tp, Lawrence Brown, Wilbur DeParis, Claude Jones tb, Jimmy Hamilton cl, ts, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges as, Al Sears ts, Harry Carney cl, bs, D.E. p, Fred Guy g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sonny Greer d, Joya Sherrill, Al Hibbler voc.

  • I’m Just A Lucky So And So
  • Long Strong And Consecutive
  • The Wonder Of You

Duke Ellington. Bluebird ND 86641; and on: The Chronological Duke Ellington & His Orch. 1945-1946. Classics 985.

  • I’m Just A Lucky So And So

Also on: Duke Ellington: The Arrival of Billy Strayhorn. Rockin’ Chair, and on: Jazz Special: D.E: The Genius. RCA NL 45181.

451128 Broadcast from The New Zanzibar, NYC. Duke Ellington & His Orch. Rex Stewart c, Cat Anderson, Shelton Hemphill, Taft Jordan tp, Lawrence Brown, Wilbur DeParis, Claude Jones tb, Jimmy Hamilton cl, ts, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges as, Al Sears ts, Harry Carney cl, bs, D.E. p, Fred Guy g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sonny Greer d, Joya Sherrill, Al Hibbler voc.

  • Crosstown
  • The Wonder Of You
  • Cotton Tail
  • I’m Just A Lucky So-And-So
  • Time’s A-Wastin’
  • Three Cent Stomp
  • Long, Strong And Consecutive
  • Blue Skies
  • Everything But You

D.E.T.S. Duke Ellington’s Treasury Shows Vol. 9. D.E.T.S. 903 9009.

4511 Broadcast from the New Zanzibar, NYC. Duke Ellington & His Orch. Rex Stewart c, Cat Anderson, Shelton Hemphill, Taft Jordan tp, Lawrence Brown, Wilbur DeParis, Claude Jones tb, Jimmy Hamilton cl, ts, Otto Hardwick, Johnny Hodges as, Al Sears ts, Harry Carney cl, bs, D.E. p, Fred Guy g, Lloyd Trotman or Oscar Pettiford b, Sonny Greer d, Joya Sherrill voc. (Desor 4592 does not mention Lloyd Trotman)

  • Take The „A” Train
  • Just A-Settin’ And A-Rockin’
  • Clementine
  • The Wonder Of You
  • I’ll Buy That Dream
  • Come To Baby, Do

D.E.T.S. Duke Ellington’s Treasury Shows Vol. 3. D.E.T.S. 903 9003.

451201 New York Amsterdam News: “Oscar Pettiford with Duke Ellington’s Band. … Pettiford broke up his trio in Los Angeles, where he moved after completing a job in San Diego.”

451226 Duke Ellington & His Orch. Rex Stewart c, Cat Anderson, Shelton Hemphill, Taft Jordan tp, Ray Nance tp, violin, Joe „Tricky Sam” Nanton, Lawrence Brown, Wilbur DeParis tb, Claude Jones vtb, Jimmy Hamilton cl, ts, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges as, Al Sears ts, Harry Carney cl, bs, Duke Ellington p, Fred Guy g, Oscar Pettiford b, Sonny Greer d.

  • Frankie And Johnny Part 1
  • Frankie And Johnny Part 2

Oscar Pettiford: Bass Hits. Topaz 1071, and on: The Legendary Duke Ellington. Swing SLDO 930.

451227 Los Angeles. Oscar Pettiford Trio. Teddy Bunn g, Nappy Lamare p, Oscar Pettiford b, “Brownie” d.

  • Indiana

The Lamplighter’s Jazz Sessions. Jazz Hour 73597. Vogue (F) 655004. – Coover Gazdar 45100: ” ‘Lamplighter Jazz’, a radio series conducted by DJ Ted Yerxa during 1944-47.” – Joseph Smith: “… was a radio show on WPAS during the mid-’40s.”

 

 

© Hans-Joachim Schmidt, themen Verlag Köln